Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Schwetzingen bathhouse -a private Italian Villa

The Schloss Schwetzingen which I mentioned last week (the Temple of Apollo) was essentially a very public space, even in the 18th century before becoming the even more public museum it is today. The elector, in order to get away from 'court life' and from the general public which were allowed into the grounds, built the Badehaus (bathhouse) as a private refuge from what was essentially his 'work'.  Imagine having to live at your office!
Built in the style of an Italian Villa the bathhouse featured not only a small sauna area but also a bedroom & sitting room - a sort of Petit Trianon at Schwetzingen!
While strictly classical I love the sense of playfulness found throughout the details. The round entrance hall is stunning.
Directly off the entry hall is the bath -thats what the building is for afterall!  You may recognize the spaces as they were featured in the May 2009 issue of World of Interiors Magazine (one of my favorites).
You also will catch a rare glimpse of my Australian Penpal in the mirrored door who is kind enough to always share his travel pictures with us here on ArchitectDesign!
Rather than a large palatial room the bedroom is quite residential, even featuring a now out-dated twin sized bed. Seriously - when was the last time you slept in a twin bed? Even kids seem to have bigger beds these days!
Don't miss the chamber pot pulled out of its' little closet with a porthole window for ventilation. Also the Wedgwood vases are unusual to spot in Germany rather than Meissen or another German porcelain.
The room above features a more typical German porcelain chandelier (Dresden or Meissen perhaps?) along with a number of very German looking figurines on the mantelpiece. I hope you enjoyed this very private look at the Schwetzingen Badehaus!

13 comments:

Stephilius said...

Charming! The railing of the plunge bath is exquisite. As is the marble or plaster "drapery" above it. The twined snakes at the edge of the bath are rather "interesting".

I wonder, are the vases - actual - Wedgwood? Certainly the style was so popular; might there have been German porcelain makers who copied it?

ArchitectDesign™ said...

Hmm, they are clearly Wedgwood style, but of course could have been copies. They really look spot on though as to being genuine Wedgwood!

The Arts by Karena said...

Stefan it is just glorious! The carved panels with the seashell motifs and the veining of the marble. Your pen pal is a gem!

xoxo
Karena
Stunning Fine Art Photography by Darryll Schiff

Row homes and Cobblestones said...

Thank you and your pen pal, for I truly enjoyed this stunning classical tour. Stefan you are right with your choice of playfulness to describe the details.

Toby Worthington said...

Stefan, your European posts are killing me--provoking envy and lust!

This particular building was something quite new, and it bowled me over. Fabulous, wondrous.

Thanks for sharing.

Emile de Bruijn said...

I love the Chinese painted silk and the Chinese wallpaper.

I am fascinated by the overlaps and differences between Chinese floral silk and Chinese floral wallpaper: the foliage and flowers were painted in more or less the same style, but on silk the patterns were often repeats, whereas on wallpaper the patterns tended to be panoramic. I suppose textile patterns had to be repeating because they would also have been used on a smaller scale, for seat covers and clothes etc. Even so, I wonder whether the silks and the wallpapers were nevertheless decorated by the same people, or the same workshops...? I clearly need to book some time travel back to 1770s Guangzhou :)

ArchitectDesign™ said...

I'm glad everyone loves these posts as much as I. I hope I can continue to bring interesting, new inspirational material to the blogosphere!

Mark Ruffner said...

It's interesting, isn't it, that when all is said and done, we associate a smaller space rather than a grand one with comfort. It all has to do with the human scale.

ArchitectDesign™ said...

Mark, oh definitely! I think the large/grand spaces are for inspiration and then when you see a HUMAN SCALE project you just want to be there.

Blue said...

I give up! We had decided not to go to Europe this winter but it looks, thanks to your posts, as if we might well think again. It's a superb series and I hope it isn't finished.

Windlost said...

A charming design! You have a penpal?! I like the cozy little twin bed. And that round entrance hall...

xo Terri

Hels said...

I certainly appreciate the need for a private bath house, one that would not be invaded by every messenger, lobbyist, courtier, distant relative and delegates from who knows where. But the building is quite large and complex, and would have needed cooking, cleaning and security staff in its own right.

Michael Hampton said...

Think I will need to do a watercolor of the bathhouse exterior! Beautiful!

Michael