Monday, May 28, 2012

Another 'modern' house plan

Again from the unbuilt section of the book "Domestic Architecture of H.T. Lindeberg" I bring you this modern houseplan.I love this melding of classical and modern. The plan is so rational it is strange to see the 1-story service spaces spilling out so organically on the upper right hand side; A strange after thought? It seems to have been hidden with the landscaping though, not a service wing in sight! I believe it was Frank Lloyd Wright who said he hid his mistakes with Ivy? How would you have solved this problem?

11 comments:

pve design said...

I do love hedges, perhaps hedges on the right ~
pve

busana muslim said...

Thank you for posting this. It’s exactly what I was looking for!

Kevin Orlin Johnson said...

It always bothers me that so many of these otherwise superb house plans have all of the service spaces spilling out of an otherwise symmetrical body--organically, you might say, but the first thought that runs through my mind is that it's like a beautiful body disembowelled. One of the things that I like about Louis Kahn is his dictum that if you can't fit all of the pieces into your form, then you have the wrong form. You can't imagine a house by Palladio, or by Gabriel, with this kind of disorder in the necessary components of a building. I can't see any excuse for it.

ArchitectDesign™ said...

Organic was pc. It's idiotic!!

Austen Redman said...

Looks a lot like a lot of small Georgian houses, symmetrical body with office wing off at one side I think we would hope to do something neater, but some old houses have much more extensice service wings.

Clare Christine said...

Interesting design, particularly the landscaping! Hope you have a wonderful week!
Toodles,
Twirling Clare
http://twirlingclare.blogspot.com/

Ann said...

I'm not a modernist, as you know, but those grounds are lovely and makes the house! When does this plan date? Just curious if it says :)

sandrajonas.com said...

I think The FLW quote was "Doctors bury their mistakes, architects plant ivy."

Correct me if I'm wrong.

That does look like the wing is an afterthought.

The Down East Dilettante said...

This is just wonderful---as you say, completely rational.

The rambling service wing, attached to a strictly designed main block, was very much a common feature of that heavily staffed era---the houses, like The Elms in Newport, that manage to hide all services within a self contained block, are far outnumbered by those that have (an often carefully screened and hidden) service wing.

Delano & Aldrich's 'Oak Knoll' on Long Island illustrates this perfectly: http://books.google.com/books?id=DvwhAQAAMAAJ&dq=bertram%20work%20delano%20%26%20aldrich&pg=PA26#v=onepage&q=bertram%20work%20delano%20&%20aldrich&f=false

magnus said...

I have long admired the plans for this house. I'd love to know for whom it was designed. As a Glen Covite (did I just invent a word?) of some 40 years standing, and pretty familiar with the local environs, I'm pretty sure that this house was never built, alas.

ArchitectDesign™ said...

Magnus, correct -it was only a proposal and never built -alas.