Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Acremead: then & now

While reading through "Small Country Houses of To-Day" by Lawrence Weaver, I came across another charming house named Acremead in Kent, England. Surprisingly the house was designed by a firm over a century ago which still exists, Smith and Brewer.One so often sees these great old houses in books and I wondered if the house still survived and in what condition. A quick google search found the house did indeed exist and looks more charming than ever!The rear facade has received a few additional windows which in my opinion only help the composition.The current owners have added a pavilion in the low garden, seen above, with work by Escape Landscape Architects where I found these recent photographs.Weaver, in his discussion on the house, commended the architects and landscapers for the clever use of a difficult, hilly site. The house was designed long and narrow with a terraced back yard which exists to this day.The gutters were originally piped into this charming lily pond, but I am not sure it still exists in the current garden.Here in this side view of the house you get a sense of the hilly siting.The new work is well done and who could argue with the addition of a pool!How much easier sleuthing has become with the aid of google!

9 comments:

Mitchell Owens said...

Alas, the pool lining is blue!

Henhurst Interiors said...

Absolutely fascinating; what a great post. Thanks so much.
All best,
Phyllis

The Devoted Classicist said...

I don't mind the additional windows, but I think the rusty red would have been more successful if just the sash had the color -- if even that -- and the frames stained to blend with the stone. But that's a very minor issue and how wonderful that the house has been so lovingly preserved. I was worried when I first started reading, but it turned out to be a great story. Thanks.

Loi Thai, Tone on Tone said...

Nice detective work. Kent is glorious and this charming home fits right in. I think the additions / changes are well done and sympathetic to the original.

Parnassus said...

The view along the drive to the house is enchanting. The rear facade looks to me like it needs some focal point, although much interest was added by arbors, stone walls, ponds and the like.

landscape architect brisbane said...

Your blog is full of the new design which inspired a lot. I have book marked your blog for visiting again. Good work best of luck keep it up.

P.Gaye Tapp at Little Augury said...

it is a charmer-and I note it is inclued in "Small Country Houses of To-Day" which is quite large, though supposed not so when compared to the great ones. pgt

lostpastremembered said...

Now you have me curious about the interior... wonder why there were no windows in the original? I am mad for that terrace... a remarkable detail. It shouldn't work because of its massiveness but it does. In fact it makes the steep terrace work. Great find... I'd love to look at your book!

Things That Inspire said...

I love it when a house is designed on a tricky site, and seeing how the architects and landscape designers deal with their challenges.

Great sleuthing job, and I appreciate your comments on the windows - I would not have noticed that.

= Holly