Friday, October 1, 2010

Arcimboldo exhibit

Last weekend I went to the National Gallery of Art East Wing to see a new exhibit about the renaissance artist, Arcimboldo.
I didn't recognize the name, but I did recognize the art. Arcimboldo (1526-1593) is best known for the paintings of the 4 seasons he did for the Holy Roman Emperor, Maximilian II. Summer is probably the most well known, seen below, dating to 1563. These portraits are comprised entirely of flowers and fruits in the most unusual and imaginative ways.
I spent hours in the exhibit examining the tiny details which are really remarkable.
However, my favorite part of the exhibit is after Arcimboldo and not by the artist himself. The artist Philip Haas created a fiberglass scultpure that is ENORMOUS of the artist's painting of 'Winter' from the 4 seasons. It is set off so well by the I.M.Pei designed space and it took me awhile to snap a photo of it with my phone without numerous tourists having their picture taken in front of it! The painting, seen below, was probably inspired by Leonardo's grotesques, which also are featured in the exhibit.
I recommend you all check out the exhibit which runs until January 9th. You won't regret it!

13 comments:

David Toms said...

I was always familiar with the art, but always thought it to be a prduct of the 1960's. Thank's so much for this post of enlightenment!

Karena said...

Stefan I have always marveled at his art and portraits!

Received and have just started the book on Vreeland, thank you so much!!

I am posting pink today!

Karena
Art by Karena

eddieross said...

Wow!! That sculpture is amazing! What a great exhibit... Thanks for sharing it with us!!

E+J

Kathy said...

When I think about scooting up to D.C. (It's only 4 hours from the beach) I usually wimp out. But this exhibit might just get me there. Typical fab posting A.D.....K

Jane K. Schott said...

I am making plans to see this for myself. I adore this art and can't believe I missed the announcement.

Thank you! Thank you!

Woody said...

That sculpture is brilliantly done. It looks like something out of a fairy tale: a mandragora grown old and shriveled or something

katiedid said...

WOW! I was familiar with these images too, but had no idea by whom or when they were done. Thanks!

jeannette said...

Enjoyed seeing these! -was not familiar with this artist.

Mark D. Ruffner said...

Stefan, thanks for a great posting. One guesses that Arcimboldo was a very original thinker, and that he had great fun! ... Mark

French Basketeer.com said...

i am a total fan of the original art; no words.....

Daniel-Halifax said...

That sculpture is amazing! Theres an artist nowadays, which I just spent forever looking for her name (on MY blog no less) whos work is a play on his! I know you'll love it...and will send it as soon as I find it!

theduchessofH said...

This reminds me of the hours I spent at the Louvre, analysing one of the world's best know statues. I would, so love to check out this exhibit.

Harrison Howard said...

The Philip Haas sculpture exemplifies for me the way certain works of art can be accessible and fun for just about everyone of any age, regardless of their underlying message. I bet this sculpture was a favorite for lots of the other visitors too. It brings to mind the idea of a book that is widely loved that creates a wave of interest in reading.