Monday, July 1, 2013

The power of blogging

Or maybe this post should be entitled "the power of oxi clean".  A few weeks ago my friend Meg of the blog PigtownDesign had written a post about some antique china she had won at auction which was heavily yellowed and using oxiclean to get out the stains.
Two weeks later, in fact this past weekend, I was at an estate sale and found a charming little antique plate which was heavily discolored for only $2 (see picture at top of the post). I remembered Meg's recommendation and decided to give it a try. It took about 10 hours soaking in the oxi-clean but look at the results; nearly perfect!
I'll be trying oxi-clean now on a number of other items; Thanks Meg! By chance, does anyone recognize the maker's mark on the back?
I received no compensation from oxi-clean (in fact I had to pay a premium in order to buy at my local drugstore!)

22 comments:

Pigtown*Design said...

Thanks for the shout! I am having great success with the Oxy-clean... and i receive no compensation from them either!

The Down East Dilettante said...

Oxyclean! Who knew? I'm going to give it a try immmediately.

I've used mild bleach solutions for years, to varying effect---one has to be aware of the problems of different glazes and types of decoration, and the effect thereon.

very, very mild bleach solutions can also be used to clean antique prints, but one should be very careful indeed. (A former print dealer of my acquaintance tells me that decades back the water in the city where he did business had sufficient chlorine content)

m denise c said...

That's good to know. I have a bucket of Oxi Clean and I only really use it for laundry.

Karen Albert said...

Stefan
I use Oxy-Clean for stains in carpet and laundry. Then when Meg wrote this post there was an aha moment! Having seen many beautiful pieces at auctions and Fleas, passing them up because of discoloration,I will see if I feel they are salvageable!

xoxo
Karena
2013 Designer Series

tokyojinja.com said...

I have a big transferware collection and numerous pieces are stained. I knew about the bleach and bake trick, but found it nerve wracking. I'm so excited to try this. Thanks so much!

Mark D. Ruffner said...

Stefan, I am so glad you posted about this. I have a china collection that goes back five generations, much of it stained (and crackled, too). I'll give this product a try!

ArchitectDesign™ said...

Many Thanks to Carin Ruff for identifying the mark as Sarreguemines from between 1866 and 1918!

David said...

I've avoided bleach because it can crystalize underneath the glaze and cause it to flake off. I've had good luck with peroxide bleach from the beauty supply store followed by heat in a very low oven, but it can take weeks.

I'll be giving this a try on a couple of things this coming long weekend. Thanks for the tip!

Kerry Steele- Design du Monde said...

I must do this also! I might never have known if not for Meg and you.

Style Court said...

Love the soft colors of your plate, Stefan. Great floral find.

Loi Thai, Tone on Tone said...

I'm also gonna try this! Gotta dig out the stained china.

Pigtown*Design said...

Just a PS... Oxyclean is NOT bleach. It has an entirely different chemical make-up. It is basically hydrogen peroxide and baking soda. So there should be no worries about bleach crystallizing under the glaze. When I clean my plates this way, I always give them a long rinse in clear water.

Paisley Curtain said...

Sure going to try it, thanks for sharing the secret.
A happy independence day!

Reggie Darling said...

Another tried and true method for cleaning discolored china is to soak it in a bath of drugstore hydrogen peroxide overnight and then warm it in a 200 degree electric oven for 15-20 minutes. Doing so brings the discoloration to the surface in tiny crystals (heating is required to make this happen), which are then easily washed away under running water. While, perhaps, a bit more complicated than Meg's process (which I look forward to trying myself), it is a gentle process that is safe for even the finest of delicate china. Reggie

Lord Cowell said...

This I did not know. I shall try it when we eventually unpack our china. Thanks.

smilla4blogs said...

Oxy-Clean is my friend, love it for antique linens too! If any one knows a dishwasher with a cycle safe enough for antique china, please let me know. Wouldn't you think someone could invent that??!

Karen Albert said...

Hi Stefan, I stopped back over to encourage you to see my post on Kerry's art!

xoxo
Karena
2013 Artists Series

pve design said...

Stefan,
Also know that white vinegar with lemons can cleanse and it is safe too. I love the scent of vinegar, lemons. Some also use vodka to clean.
I love these "Ask Eloise" sort of tips.
Hope you are enjoying your summer and staying cool.
Pretty porcelain plate.
pve

Pura Vida said...

Thank you for clarifying no compensation for your oxiclean commercial..bummer :-)

But it is a great product..I have considered using it on my teeth..maybe some brave blogger will do it first and I won't have to be the one.

btw...I love this pretty little dish!

Ann said...

I'm telling you that stuff is magic!

home before dark said...

Late to the cleanup party. I have to try this. Also appreciated Reggie's comment and have to agree with Smila. I have a Miele and as much as it cost, it should load the dishwasher itself! Now, if it could only clean my china!

Shaune said...

A few years ago I was cleaning my sink with oxi clean. My yellowed jadeite dishes were sitting there taunting me so I thought what the heck. Within a couple hours of soaking they looked brand new!