Tuesday, April 6, 2010

Look up!

While visiting the cherry blossoms this past weekend, I dropped into my favorite building on the National Mall, the Freer Gallery. In the main entry hall, I had to stop to take a picture of the most beautiful plaster coffered ceiling I've ever seen. So intricate, but I think the plain white keeps it from being too busy.
The unusual round bronze chandelier breaks up the straight lines of the ceiling admirably. Next visit to the National Mall, stop into the Freer. If not to see the beautiful building, stop to see a gorgeous collection of Asian arts as well as select pieces from the Aesthetic Movement (including Whistler's famous Peacock Room!)

8 comments:

Acanthus and Acorn said...

Wouldn't you just like to ask eveyone to leave so you could lie on your back and admire it?

Dandy said...

I wrote one of my college papers on the Peacock Room, and I have always wanted to see it. It's on my bucket list! Now I want to check out that ceiling, too.

Renee Finberg said...

wow
this is beautiful.

xx

Sally@DivineDistractions said...

I go around looking at ceilings all the time. I guess it's a throwback to when I used to paint murals and faux finishes for a living. I've done waaaay to many clouds on ceilings! Have you seen the ceiling in the Peabody hotel in Memphis? It's really beautiful as well.

ArchitectDesign™ said...

Acanthus -I practically did! That first picture was harder to take than you'd think ;-)

Dandy, It's magnificent! Both the peacock room and this building. It's a sedate and quite neoclassical building full of architectural surprises and subtle details. the collection is superb!

Sally, I've never been to Memphis -but after seeing that ceiling online, I want to visit!

Brillante Home Decor said...

Great to discover another interesting blog. I will follow you and your list of blogs. Ceiling? Exquisite!

Austen Redman said...

I think in "The Stones of Venice"John Ruskin promotes the idea that highly modeled surfaces should be plain colours - flat surfaces should have colour and pattern applied. I have seen recent examples of elaborate ceilings painted in bright colours and the effect isn't pleasant.

Theodore Warner said...

How do you make these things... is it like pouring jello into a jello mold? Upside down?