Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Tintinhull House

Tintinhull House is a beautiful house mostly known for its arts & crafts garden. Located in Somerset, England, the gardens surround a 17th century house which is built of the local stone, Ham stone. The house and property belonged to the Napper family until 1814 when it passed through the hands of numerous families before it was bought by Phyllis Reiss in 1933.

Phyllis designed the gardens in the Hidecote style and developed them before gifting them to the National Trust in 1955. She continued to live in the house, caring for the gardens, till her death in 1961. Since then the house has gone through a number of lucky residents. I suppose living in the middle of a tourist attraction wouldn't be so bad if it were so beautiful!
Plan your visit at the National Trust
More information from Wikipedia
Photo courtesy of an Australian friend who visited last month. Thanks! Look forward to some more of his beautiful photographs of English country houses!

19 comments:

Things That Inspire said...

That's what I love about classic architecture - hundreds of years later, and the scale and proportion of this home look beautiful even to the jaded 21st century eye.

★ Crazy Drile™ said...

congratulations for your amazing blog...


greetings from Australia

Crazy Drile

Blue said...

Lovely photo, Stefan. Very nostalgic for me at the moment as it reminds me of the deeply green nature of the British countryside. A wetter, plumper green that here because of the rain. Good to see an imperfect lawn again!

ArchitectDesign™ said...

TTI, the classics never go out of style!
Thanks TD!
Blue - perfectly imperfect indeed! The photo reminds me of parts of Pennsylvania as well, where I'm from.

home before dark said...

Stately but approachable. I always love when homes and gardens are built with local stone. Mother Nature has a way of shining a special light on her local work. Let me know if want the DC Houses book.

ArchitectDesign™ said...

HBD, i would love to see it -send me an email to work out the dtls.

Janet said...

Oh, those lichen-covered walls are enough to make me swoon. Looking forward to more...!

Michael Hampton said...

I have died and gone to heaven!

ArchitectDesign™ said...

You and your Lichen, Janet!
Michael, I thought the same exact thing!

пумпалче (whipping top) said...

with tears in my eyes and a silly smile on my face 'I want...'
I just came across your blog, and I adore it already! 'Mud in your eyes!'

David Toms said...

I can see myself living there!

Foquinha! said...

Loving all things and your blog as always... Cheers!!!

pve design said...

So stunning...I adore all the walls. Love to go visit!
pve

Kwana said...

I dream of English country houses. This one is lovely.

Diane Dorrans Saeks said...

AD-
So inspirational.
Just one beautiful symmetrical picture says it all.
It's a watery day, the skies are glaucous and perhaps even spitting with rain. It's necessary for the lawn, which could do with a drop or two. Notice the dense green shade.
And only the English (not the British--that's a different thing, often confusing Americans)--can set out that composition of straight lines and globes of massive shrubs and then accents of white hydrangeas (not hydrangea) and they so appreciate (and leave) lichen spots and daubs.
More gardens in the Cotswolds, more English gardens, more Devon and Dorset and Derbyshire, please! www.thestylesaloniste.com

Empire Design said...

beautiful post, wonderful blog .... EmpireLady .... she's a stickler, has sent you some pictures from home to add a further layer of confusion to the issue of the terms British and English .... what about Anglo Irish architecture and grdens ?

Renee Finberg said...

this estate looks beautiful.
i would love to explore it.
x

stagingworks2009 said...

I love this one buddy. It looks green and peaceful. THanks for sharing such idea. From Home Stager Toronto

Cote de Texas said...

I'm just curious how you got a picture of my grandfather's house? hmmm.