Friday, February 6, 2009

Indoor Gardens, Atocha

This cold weather has me thinking of indoor gardens. In Madrid is the most beautiful indoor JUNGLE in the main train station, Atocha. The plants are watered every few hours by these big misters, you can see them in action here above. The original station that was built in 1851 was destroyed by fire, and this new station was built in 1892 by Alberto de Palacio Elissagne and Gustave Eiffel (recognize that name??).
The space is huge, I'm not sure if my pictures captured it, but there are walkways cutting through the jungle space. Not a bad way to spend time while waiting for a train!The station itself is a really interesting early industrial space. Look at the grilles on this window below, pretty ornate and yet still industrial. I love that detail.All pictures are my own from my trip to Madrid 2 years ago.

4 comments:

Petra Voegtle said...

Hi Stefan,
this is absolutely beautiful. I am really a sucker for indoor gardens as well as industrial belle epoche style. I love huge conservatories or any bigger places covered with glass and growing trees and other plants inside.
I have read that this station was built by a co-worker of Eiffel - no wonder that the beautiful windows immediately caught my eye.
The most beautiful airport I have ever seen with thousands of plants growing indoors is Singapore airport - you would never think it's an airport but rather a botanical garden.

Janet said...

Oh, beautiful! Have you been to the Botanic Gerden here in DC lately...such a great place to hang out on a cold day!

ArchitectDesign said...

Petra, I've seen pictures of the singapore airport -it's pretty magnificent!
Janet, I haven't been to the botanical gardens here, i usually go every few months. I love it there, plus it's never very crowded. When I was there last in December they had the models of the different local monuments built out of tree bark and leaves!

Beautiful Living said...

That looks extraordinary! Love it. Don't think I've seen anything like it! I agree about the arcitectural details, beautiful! Does the skylight provide enough light for the plants?